Friday, August 8, 2008

The Death Penalty Is Not Hot

I know we have already dealt with a lot of politics this week, but I saw an incredible movie that tremendously affected my opinion on the death penalty and the criminal justice system in general. This is coming from someone whose favorite shows are Gossip Girl, Project Runway, and General Hospital. Before this movie, I could see both sides of the issue. After this movie, it was clear that (because there are innocent people on death row among other reasons ) the death penalty is inhumane. I highly recommend that you see After Innocence (2005), but have plenty of tissues close at hand. The men who are imprisoned and later exonerated are remarkable. Instead of being bitter, they are fighting to change the system for other victims of injustice. Even the trailer for After Innocence is powerful and moving.



One of the men that the Innocence Project helped exonerate is trying to make changes to the criminal justice system in California. This is his story.



There is still much work to be done for those who are wrongfully convicted. Life After Exoneration Program has programs to help the wrongfully convicted after they are released, and Innocence Project is pushing to change the laws in many states so the exonerated can get their records expunged and get compensated for the many years they have lost.

I'd love to know how you feel about the death penalty and the plight of the wrongfully convicted.

Food for thought,
Krom

2 comments:

madeleine said...

Certainly one of your heavier posts but none the less, an important subject. It took me a few days to even watch the trailers on your blog but I am glad I did. Those few moments did change my views on the death penalty. I am going to try to rent the film this week. Thanks for opening my eyes to things other than sample sales.

Krom said...

I'm glad you watched the videos; we are fortunate that these men (the wrongfully convicted), Innocence Project, and Life After Exoneration Program are working so hard to improve the criminal justice system and the lives of the wrongfully convicted.